Careers, Interviewing, Jobs

3 Things I Suggest You Do While Interviewing

3 Things I Suggest You Do While Interviewing

1.) Slow Down Your Interviewing 

When you’re interviewing, you may feel as though every statement out of your mouth is being judged and criticized to the highest extent, leaving you to talk a mile a minute, hoping that if your last sentence wouldn’t win an Emmy nomination, the next one will make up for it.

The truth is, when interviewing and in life, it’s about what you say, not how much you can fit into a 30 minute conversation.

While filling the discussion with small talk about your dog or the weather won’t convince the interviewer you’re right for the job, a few solid, relevant points will show you’re a capable, confident candidate.

Also, from a behavioral interviewing standpoint, it will show you are a job seeker who isn’t intimidated by a simple conversation.

2.) Tell The Truth

Words that are written on your resume can act as a metaphorical “gatekeeper.” While those words can allow you to get to the first round of interviews, it’s really only about 25% of what makes an interview process successful.

Culture fit plays a huge role in not only interviewing, but whether you’d be happy at the company once you get the job.

You may think an interview should consist of feeding the interviewer what they want to hear.   In reality, being your natural self and having a mutual discussion will allow the company to understand your true strengths and weaknesses.

Then, if you do meet enough criteria and they do want to bring you on, it will allow them to assess how they can provide career training in an effective, mutually beneficial way.

career applicants interviewing

3.) Listen (It’s Harder Than You Think)

It’s very common to have been raised by the notion that you should always think about what you’re going to say before you say it.

Obviously, in a lot of cases this is true and can keep us all out of trouble, but it often leads people to forfeit active listening in order to plan their next move.

There’s nothing wrong with taking a few seconds after a question to think of a natural, thoughtful response.

In fact, I bet the interviewer with be thankful to receive a relevant response, as opposed to another cookie cutter answer that sounds good out of context, but in the end leaves both parties a little bit lost.

Previous ArticleNext Article
A graduate from Seton Hall University, Casey Haduch helps KAS Placement's clients integrate better staffing and executive search processes into their business model. Since being at KAS Placement, she has become a senior member of the team and has assisted countless job seekers in improving their career.

Leave a Reply