Casey Haduch

A graduate from Seton Hall University, Casey Haduch helps KAS Placement's clients integrate better staffing and executive search processes into their business model. Since being at KAS Placement, she has become a senior member of the team and has assisted countless job seekers in improving their career.
"interviewing preparation"

Do You Know How To Prepare For an Interview?

Do You Know How To Prepare For an Interview?

A common oversight a lot of job seekers make when preparing for an interview is to get wrapped up in the finer details of the company and role.

In reality, remembering to see the big picture may be more effective in helping you get ahead. Knowing the CEO’s name, when the company was established and your top three strengths and weaknesses may show you did some homework, but a lot of the time these points won’t even be brought up during a 30 minute conversation.

In the end, the goal of the interview is to see whether you’d be a fit at the company and can not only perform the duties of the job, but perform them successfully.

That being said, it may be more important to prepare in a manner that allows you to shine and also proves to the interviewer that you’re not only interested, but will be fully invested in the company’s overall goals and success.

These three tips should allow you to go into an interview with a clear head that isn’t full of useless facts, but relevant topics of discussion that will lead to a mutually beneficial conversation.

Preparation Recommendations

1.) Write Out The Points You Want To Highlight (Yes, Physically)

You’ve worked hard to have a better career and a job interview is a more than an appropriate time to show off your accomplishments. While you may have typed up your resume (or had a professional lend a hand), there’s much more to you than what’s on a sheet of paper.

Sometimes, actually writing down your proudest achievements on paper will allow you to recall them naturally during an interview.

By reviewing these beforehand, you shouldn’t be stumbling for the right words to say.

2.) Familiarize Yourself With The Company (Beyond The “About Us”)

Sure, an interviewer may be impressed that you know the company’s tagline, but that’s something you could have Googled in the waiting room before being meeting face-to-face.

What’s more impressive is taking the time to read company press releases, or browsing through their social media to get a feel for the culture.

These are the things that actually take effort and will show your existing commitment to the team without having even received an offer (yet).

While it may only take 20 minutes to understand the company’s growth within the last year, there’s no doubt the interviewer will appreciate the effort.

3.) Prepare Questions You Actually Want To Know The Answer To

Canned questions realistically don’t serve a real purpose besides checking off the textbook requirement that you have questions prepared. In the end, they’re really just filler.

The question segment of an interview is your chance to get the information you really want to know and creates a sense that you’re actually taking the interview seriously.

Having an interviewer clarify a point he or she made earlier, or asking about the growth trajectory of the role are great jumping off points that will serve both parties.

At the end of the day, an interview is meant to help both you and the company achieve your goals. In 30 minutes, you can potentially create a better quality of life, so why not prepare for it?

interviewing

3 Things I Suggest You Do While Interviewing

3 Things I Suggest You Do While Interviewing

1.) Slow Down Your Interviewing 

When you’re interviewing, you may feel as though every statement out of your mouth is being judged and criticized to the highest extent, leaving you to talk a mile a minute, hoping that if your last sentence wouldn’t win an Emmy nomination, the next one will make up for it.

The truth is, when interviewing and in life, it’s about what you say, not how much you can fit into a 30 minute conversation.

While filling the discussion with small talk about your dog or the weather won’t convince the interviewer you’re right for the job, a few solid, relevant points will show you’re a capable, confident candidate.

Also, from a behavioral interviewing standpoint, it will show you are a job seeker who isn’t intimidated by a simple conversation.

2.) Tell The Truth

Words that are written on your resume can act as a metaphorical “gatekeeper.” While those words can allow you to get to the first round of interviews, it’s really only about 25% of what makes an interview process successful.

Culture fit plays a huge role in not only interviewing, but whether you’d be happy at the company once you get the job.

You may think an interview should consist of feeding the interviewer what they want to hear.   In reality, being your natural self and having a mutual discussion will allow the company to understand your true strengths and weaknesses.

Then, if you do meet enough criteria and they do want to bring you on, it will allow them to assess how they can provide career training in an effective, mutually beneficial way.

career applicants interviewing

3.) Listen (It’s Harder Than You Think)

It’s very common to have been raised by the notion that you should always think about what you’re going to say before you say it.

Obviously, in a lot of cases this is true and can keep us all out of trouble, but it often leads people to forfeit active listening in order to plan their next move.

There’s nothing wrong with taking a few seconds after a question to think of a natural, thoughtful response.

In fact, I bet the interviewer with be thankful to receive a relevant response, as opposed to another cookie cutter answer that sounds good out of context, but in the end leaves both parties a little bit lost.